god life is good 
god come back 
why have you forsaken me 
and why have I forgotten 
god life is good I love it I love it I love it 
right? 

you know how I self-medicate every morning 
outskirts of a bathroom window fill my lungs 
and I breathe the world’s morning dawning singing somewhere 
standing in wait and waiting for me to stand 
for the right thing in my head 

do do do 
this is your next step 
create create create 
and stop thinking about creating 
live live live 
and be responsible 
contradictcontradictcontradictcontradictcontradictionoverload

god, life is good. 
I saw your breeze again. 
I remember you. I never forgot. 
I just forget sometimes.          

I brushed my teeth so well 
they’re damaged now 
I prayed to some big picture that surrounds me 
just like I should 
but it all came up in my mind
as some guy on a throne again.

Try to understand Zen through laughter, not through prayer. Try to understand Zen through flowers, butterflies, sun, moon, children, people in all their absurdities. Watch this whole panorama of life, all these colors, the whole spectrum. Zen is not a doctrine, it is not a dogma. It is growing into an insight. It is a vision — very light-hearted, not serious at all. Be light-hearted, light-footed. Be of light step. Don’t carry religion like a burden. And don’t expect religion to be a teaching; it is not. It is certainly a discipline, but not a teaching at all. Teaching has to be imposed upon you from the outside and teaching can only reach to your mind, never to your heart, and never, never to the very center of your being. Teaching remains intellectual. It is an answer to human curiosity, and curiosity is not a true search.
— Osho (via lazyyogi)
Reblogged from gnostix2

With the demise of my own community’s two most revered leaders, Sandusky and Joe Paterno, I have decided to continue to respect my elders, but to politely tell them, ‘Out of my way.’ They have had their time to lead. Time’s up. I’m tired of waiting for them to live up to obligations.

Think of the world our parents’ generation inherited. They inherited a country of boundless economic prosperity and the highest admiration overseas, produced by the hands of their mothers and fathers. They were safe. For most, they were endowed opportunities to succeed, to prosper, and build on their parents’ work. For those of us in our 20s and early 30s, this is not the world we are inheriting.

Thomas L. Day, from his powerful piece in The Washington Post“Penn State, My Final Loss of Faith.” 

A participant in the Second Mile foundation as a teenager, a Catholic, an Iraq war veteran, and a Penn State alum, Mr. Day calls his parents’ generation to task and lets his anger be known.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

(via beingblog)

Reblogged from On Being Tumblr
O my heart, do you really prefer what can be touched and smelled and tasted, what is known and solid and understood to mystery? Or is there even a little space for unexpected leaping joy in the marvels met but still unknown, the ways of grace and of healing that operate without undergirding law? Can we find blessing, my heart, in mystery without having to sleuth out everything? Can’t we rest in the blessing, trust in the blessing, sing into the blessing and rejoice in the song that comes to us, unknown in every way – yet to it we already belong, to it we are coming home? Amen.
kellydanielle:

Matthew 7:7

Taking this verse at face value: You can only know more if you dare to ask.
But I want to push into this verse harder, because I believe the eternal question is the most important religious experience, not eternal answers. I don’t believe there’s a big red ribbon tied to the end of every quandary.
I used to picture heaven as a place, maybe a big library, and Jesus the librarian will answer every question you’ve ever had, then send you off to the meadows to play and paint and sing and…
Yeah. I’m not sure about that anymore. And that’s OK. It helps to imagine a paradise like this to make the metaphor more vibrant in our current lives. But I am now, finally, OK with not knowing the answer to everything. If I did, I wouldn’t be asking the right questions, would I?
Because too often we replace the real, true, hard, deep questions with answerable ones.  
Seek and ye shall find… more questions. More holy questions than you ever knew.

kellydanielle:

Matthew 7:7

Taking this verse at face value: You can only know more if you dare to ask.

But I want to push into this verse harder, because I believe the eternal question is the most important religious experience, not eternal answers. I don’t believe there’s a big red ribbon tied to the end of every quandary.

I used to picture heaven as a place, maybe a big library, and Jesus the librarian will answer every question you’ve ever had, then send you off to the meadows to play and paint and sing and…

Yeah. I’m not sure about that anymore. And that’s OK. It helps to imagine a paradise like this to make the metaphor more vibrant in our current lives. But I am now, finally, OK with not knowing the answer to everything. If I did, I wouldn’t be asking the right questions, would I?

Because too often we replace the real, true, hard, deep questions with answerable ones.  

Seek and ye shall find… more questions.
More holy questions than you ever knew.

Reblogged from Selah
Tags: god questions

The origins of this codex

I once published a chapbook about a decade ago, back in the days when I still believed in poetry and literature. I called it The New Codices. Even though much of it wasn’t directly about God, it had a ring to it, a reverence. It was a new kind of scripture that didn’t need all that religion attached to it. Poetry, prose, essays, random quotes, gathered together in one photocopied and bound book. That’s the way I liked it.

Then I left stupid poetry for facts.

Facts seemed cool. They were reliable. You could even make a living off off them. And that’s what I’m doing now. But a decade later, some nameless art with words still rises in me, and it needs an outlet desperately.

I will post those musings, thoughts and observances here, as well as some snippets from my chapbook and journals from the past.

I may make a living with facts, but with this codex, I can finally tell the truth.